Friday, March 8, 2019

5Y3591 Stabilizer Trim Actuator appears to be Nose Down

When KHOU took a video tour of the collected wreckage, they included a frame of the stabilizer trim actuator (the jackscrew).

https://youtu.be/qOa4V4JF4t4


What is notable is the position of the stabilizer. It is not certain this is the position of the stabilizer while inflight, the crash impact may have changed something.

Here is a picture of the actuator installed in a 767.


https://www.airspacemag.com/videos/category/flight-today/ptq-put-together-quickly/

What is apparent is that the stabilizer position would correlate to nose down.

The NTSB has flight data records which will confirm the stabilizer trim position. Hopefully a brief is forthcoming to inform us of what has been found. There is a sense of urgency for the NTSB to reveal any issues that might be applicable to airplanes in-service.

Thanks to the twitterverse to answer some of these questions, especially @AILERON001,  @bryan_holl_70,  @GuardedDon@Airlandseaman 



Stay tuned!

Peter Lemme

peter @ satcom.guru
Follow me on twitter: @Satcom_Guru
Copyright 2019 satcom.guru All Rights Reserved

Peter Lemme has been a leader in avionics engineering for 38 years. He offers independent consulting services largely focused on avionics and L, Ku, and Ka band satellite communications to aircraft. Peter chaired the SAE-ITC AEEC Ku/Ka-band satcom subcommittee for more than ten years, developing ARINC 791 and 792 characteristics, and continues as a member. He contributes to the Network Infrastructure and Interfaces (NIS) subcommittee developing Project Paper 848, standard for Media Independent Secure Offboard Network.

Peter was Boeing avionics supervisor for 767 and 747-400 data link recording, data link reporting, and satellite communications. He was an FAA designated engineering representative (DER) for ACARS, satellite communications, DFDAU, DFDR, ACMS and printers. Peter was lead engineer for Thrust Management System (757, 767, 747-400), also supervisor for satellite communications for 777, and was manager of terminal-area projects (GLS, MLS, enhanced vision).

An instrument-rated private pilot, single engine land and sea, Peter has enjoyed perspectives from both operating and designing airplanes. Hundreds of hours of flight test analysis and thousands of hours in simulators have given him an appreciation for the many aspects that drive aviation; whether tandem complexity, policy, human, or technical; and the difficulties and challenges to achieving success.

No comments:

Post a Comment